Tag Archives: Gay rights

Finally: an Evangelical who Acts like a Christian

When I first discussed Obama’s inaction on gay rights last week, I had no idea that the House bill (discussed here), which finally protects gay people from hate crimes, was soon to be passed; likewise, when I discussed that House bill, I had no idea that its passage came on the eve of this weekend’s National Equality March, a march to raise awareness of the second-class treatment of homosexual citizens here in the U.S.  Obama spoke to a crowd of about 2,000 on Saturday night, expressing the usual platitudes in better-than-average language, and promised to do something about “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”…whenever he gets around to it.

Today, I read something that gave me real hope: the story of an evangelical Christian who used to spew forth all your average “Christian” hate-speech when it came to homosexuality (homosexuals in particular), but who has since seen the error of his ways through a little honest self-reflection and has repented by joining the cause for equal rights for gay Americans so enthusiastically that he’s marching this weekend.  His story gives me hope in Christians, who for the most part take only a name from Christ and reject any of his humble, loving commandments in order that the tenets of faith in America can be based on feel-good, best-selling crap like The Prayer of Jabez (“I can have a McMansion and worry about accumulating wealth because an obscure figure in the Old Testament prayed for God to improve his lot and God did it!”).  Yes, these tenets can magically replace anything humanistic or difficult in the teachings of Christ and make “Christians” feel like the glaring contradictions in their own lives and the life of Jesus are excusable– a true miracle of God!  So it is with great satisfaction that I witness someone stepping out of a meaningless Joel Osteen lifestyle and into something more akin to the compassionate, non-judgmental, ever-understanding, ever-unafraid lifestyle of the guy who showed us all how to live back in the first century.  Read “A Step in Faith”:

Every person coming to Washington—whether they are religious or not—does share one faith, and that is faith in America. We can and must do better. As the progress of history has shown, Americans will prove themselves able to see beyond religion-based bigotry to the promises of equal treatment for all. Those who use religion-based bigotry to persecute and discriminate against LGBT people are on the wrong side of history, just as they were with slavery, interracial marriage, the treatment of women, and so many other issues.

Gays Finally Acknowledged as Hated Group

Congress has finally stepped up and done something pro-gay, pro-human, pro-democracy: the House passed a bill making it a federal crime to assault people based on sexual orientation, which is expected to make it through the Senate sometime later, and so the U.S. is finally admitting that people are abused, beaten, and even killed solely for being gay!  This is a baby step toward complete legal equality of gay citizens with their straight counterparts.  What’s not to like about this?  The Republicans, of course, have the answer:

“This is radical social policy that is being put on the defense authorization bill, on the backs of our soldiers, because they probably can’t pass it on its own,” House Republican leader John Boehner of Ohio said.

Translation:

Woe unto you, White Christian America: you are under attack!  These anti-American, anti-Christian, Communist Democrat perverts are making our blessed, freedom-loving troops (never mind that a lot of troops are gay) carry the disgusting weight of this terrible, horrible, sodomite legislation!  They are busy trying to fight for your freedom, not gay freedom!  Yea verily, this day shall live in infamy!

Rep. John Boehner

Rep. John Boehner

Remind me how it’s okay to keep denying equal protection to gay Americans.  Please tell me why being gay is wrong and deserves only intermittent civil liberties, and try not to use any ancient divine command or your own aversion to “kissing another guy (or girl)” as a solid argument.